Giving Love Explained.


Let me just say a few things before I really go into this post.

  1. Kyle Hanagami is a BEAST. Period.
  2. This song gives me the “feels” beyond explanation.
  3. Ed Sheeran is pretty much thee Ginger Jesus and he is here to save the music industry. I’m not even kidding, he’s one of the best artists our generation has to offer. I was blessed enough to go to a live show and I was pretty much re-born.
  4. I’ve over-played this video so many times, I’m probably why it has thousands of views (or everyone else who swims in the Ocean of Awesome has found it and hit play) on YouTube.
  5. What came out of this video: the donation to cancer research, participation with the audience, the emotion exerted into the choreography, the visuals, and overall message is incredible. Please redirect back to my first point.

Love is such a hard thing to explain but such a great feeling to experience. In my previous post, Relationships Explained, I tried  to find the right words and bring this kind of topic to justice. I want to go a bit deeper and touch on how love isn’t just found in a romantic relationship. Love is feeling valued, like you actually matter, because someone cares about your well-being and wants to ensure that you never forget you are worth it. In Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, I stated how love was absent in relationships. But it is more important to dive into how important that feeling is. In the beginning of the video we see that Kyle receives a letter that is full of negativity, which he then rips, and goes to break into his choreography. I feel like the novel’s character Linda, is just like Kyle in the start of the clip. She has been hurt and ridiculed for so long. Derogatory words on paper were lived in reality and constantly attached to her name. The song “Give Me Love” is pretty self-explanatory… it’s asking you to give him/her love. I think the voice really calls out the cry that Linda makes. I feel the desperation in her story like I feel the desperation in the song. Linda wants to be valued and truly feel love, because the pain has to give hope to a more positive emotion. There’s gotta be some pay off. Love is a sort of liberation, freedom in the constraints of pain. Not only does this apply to Linda, but also to her mistress, Mrs. Flint. As jealous as she is, she too, wants love. This paranoia she experiences is because of her desire of love. Mrs. Flint is aware of her husband’s unfaithfulness, but continues to work towards acquiring his affection, even if her ways of reaching them are wrong. Still, I understand her longing to be seen as her husband’s love, not just a wife. The partnership is not enough, it is missing that special connection to really be one.

Believe it or not, this video/song/post, applies to Dr.Flint as well. I’ve expressed how much I dislike his character (because I hate cheaters, creeps, and abusive people. Who doesn’t?) But it was as if this song was created by Dr. Flint.

Give me love like never before,
‘Cause lately I’ve been craving more,
And it’s been a while but I still feel the same,
Maybe I should let you go,

You know I’ll fight my corner,
And that tonight I’ll call ya,
After my blood is drowning in alcohol,
No, I just wanna hold ya.

I pictured him in a more vulnerable state as I listened to this song, particularly as the lyrics above played. He’s a character that seems to be stuck in this life of misery. Because of slavery, he has developed this mindset of having to rule, being the emotionless, harsh authority figure who is immovable.  He needs something different, something that has depth like he has never felt before. Dr. Flint needs a damn hug. This song expresses the same desperation of Linda’s for Dr. Flint. Perhaps if he had received love that was so pure, he wouldn’t be this horrible man. Had his upbringing been full of affection and learning to reciprocate this attitude, and not about how slavery can benefit him, Dr. Flint can be more likable. Perhaps he would respect Linda and his wife. I’d even dare to say he would be capable to love another. This song explains, as well as serves as Dr. Flint’s apology to why he is the way he is. Intense right?

This pain reflects on so many of us and the solution to it all is love.

If you read my About Me, you’d see I attend St. John’s University… and we are required to take a few Theology courses. So, my professor from my Christian Marriage course would give me a whole repeat lecture on how love is definitely not an emotion but “a voluntary decision to act upon the good of another.” And I get it! But I would like to think that because we act for the good of another, we value them. Love is why we act.

Kyle’s video throws a punch right to my gut, in both a good and bad way, where bad… is actually a little good too. Follow me? At my lowest points, I just want someone to pick me up and tell me I’ll be okay. I want someone to tell me they are there for me. I need assurance that I am loved. In my highest point, I feel closely related to the end of the video. I feel so liberated. I want to throw confetti in the air or jump up and down, because I have people who love me and we are in celebration (of whatever it is) together. During Ed’s live performance of this song, the whole Hammerstein Ballroom felt like it was floating on air. People were singing at the top of their lungs, some had their hands in the air like they were praying to God above, others I even saw crying. It’s because it connected. We all know what pain feels like. But when we are given love, things change. That’s because love is freeing. It feels great to be free and it feels amazing to be loved.

Relationships Explained.

As a girl in her 20s, I’ve probably had more phone calls and conversations about relationships than those actually hired to give any “professional” advice get. Can you believe that? People are paid to give relationship/love advice. I do it for free! Hm, maybe that’s why they come running to me. But if there’s a job for it, then it must be a real issue. Oh humans and their emotions. 

After collecting my mental archive of advice and recalling the situations expressed to me by my “clients” there is one thing that I believe is a major issue: none of them really understand what a relationship demands. This would make sense, because there are more whys, what does it mean, and how can I change it questions than there are answers. There are more times trying to make it work, than it actually working out. There are more doubts then there is trust. There is more intellect than there are feelings. And if there is anything you should take away from this post, it’s this: A relationship will not work if your mind is the only one calling the shots. No, I’m not telling you to let your heart take the wheel in a relationship, but I am telling you to allow it to be the compass; because your mind will know what to do. They are a team, as are you and your partner. So, when I say don’t let your mind call the shots, I mean you have to be unselfish and let your partner in on things.

I cannot stress enough how important it is to be emotionally invested in a relationship. It is not a business deal! You absolutely cannot go into it thinking that the outcome will be exactly as you mapped it out to be. It definitely is a learning process, somewhat contractual, risky, rewarding, and overall crazy, but if your heart isn’t in it… then why are you even there?

Let’s take relationships in Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl for example. Dr. Flint tries to bribe Linda for her affection. Now, Dr. Flint is in no ways a real man. He is abusive and unfaithful. Despite having this “fondness” for Linda, he constantly reminds her that she is nothing but his slave. It is obvious that Dr. Flint wants Linda to be another one of his women, but this also proves that he wants to own her completely, not only physically but emotionally as well. He promises to take care of her and even starts to build a home where she will stay. However, Linda already loves someone else and cannot ever imagine being with a brute like Dr. Flint. Let us again note, this guy is married! Remember when I said you need to be unselfish? Yeah, there is no way Dr. Flint understands that idea. The courtship between Dr. Flint and Linda (if you even call it that) is all a mental game. Seeing it that way messes up the real meaning of a relationship. It’s not about a power-trip or how can you buy one’s affection, it is about unity. Because Dr. Flint lacks a real sense of affection for Linda, she does not even entertain the thought of being with him.

As for Dr. Flint’s wife, emotion is the only thing that controls her. She knows her husband is being unfaithful to her, but still she brushes it aside. Marriage is the most important relationship you can choose. Vows made by you and your partner are not just any promises, but real affirmations of love… an eternal agreement. Because Mrs. Flint cannot allow her mind to make the decision to leave him, she is further consumed with jealousy and no longer love. She will always doubt her husband, feel insecure, and paranoid of what Dr. Flint will do next. I can honestly say, I feel bad for her. She knows that the bond of marriage seals her and Dr. Flint together, but that doesn’t guarantee his fidelity.

Relationships themselves can be seen as a form of submission. It’s just another way to be bound to something, someone. But the most liberating thing about relationships is the freedom to really express how you feel to the person you are with. It shouldn’t feel like an obligation. In the context of the novel, slavery proves to be the evil seed that grows to rip not only individuals, but families apart. Relationships, specifically romantic ones, are rooted in love. This love is not solely an emotion but an action to willing do what is best for another. Slavery rejects this, because it, in no ways, works for the betterment of another. It entraps everyone into misery.

In both cases we see that the relationships lack this sense of love. It’s anything but love that binds these people together. With the story of Linda and Mrs. Flint, I can feel like they are desperate for love. The relationship is so one-sided and all about it being a title, that the most beautiful thing about having one is absent. As the saying goes, “It takes two to tango.” However, for a tango to be convincing, we need to feel the spark. The partners need to work as one to make the dance complete.

Slavery and Childhood Explained.

When I think back on my childhood, I remember putting a quarter into the little horse ride in front of our local shoe shop; begging for another turn. I remember Arts & Crafts and Story-time in Mrs. Frances’ class. I remember my brother and I running around in our backyard and falling off my bike. I remember holiday parties with family and receiving more gifts than my little arms could hold.  I remember the first time ever crushing on a boy, all because he made me a card using green construction paper and lots of glitter. I’d like to think he knew me pretty well. But the most invigorating thing about childhood was my freedom and belief that I was truly free… because I was.

And that’s what childhood should look like: a picture of freedom and happiness. But the sad reality is some are not as fortunate as I was growing up.

In Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, we can see how slavery strips one of their childhood. Linda Brent was cared for and sheltered by her parents since the age of six, able to live a pretty normal life, free of being identified as a slave. However, when they died, the shadow of her slave identity creeped in faster than she could blink. Under Dr. Flint’s household, Linda was subjected to the same mistreatment we read about in previous novels. She was ordered, abused, and deprived of her basic human rights. Let us remember, she is still a young girl. Can you imagine? Growing up feeling privileged and having some sense of self-worth because you had parents that nurtured you, then being forced under such brutality by Dr. Flint?

This caused Linda to grow up quicker than most. She needed to learn her duties, express respect for those who hurt her, and endure the pain and agony of slavery. Linda was not seen as a child by her owners. She was a slave, a piece of property, and nothing else. Jacobs’ novel show readers that in slavery, a child’s innocence is taken from them. That at their young age, their life is predetermined to be subjected to their masters, unable to dream or live as they pleased without suffering consequences. Linda’s story of two young sisters captured the effects of slavery on children and their childhood:

I once saw two beautiful children playing together. One was a fair white child; the other was her slave, and also her sister. When I saw them embracing each other, and heard their joyous laughter, I turned sadly away from the lovely sight. I foresaw the inevitable blight that would fall on the little slave’s heart. I knew how soon her laughter would be changed to sighs. The fair child grew up to be a still fairer woman. From childhood to womanhood her pathway was blooming with flowers, and overarched by a sunny sky. Scarcely one day of her life had been clouded when the sun rose on her happy bridal morning.

How had those years dealt with her slave sister, the little playmate of her childhood? She, also, was very beautiful; but the flowers and sunshine of love were not for her. She drank the cup of sin, and shame, and misery, whereof her persecuted race are compelled to drink. (Chapter 5)

Both children are seen as innocent, full of laughter and happiness. They are oblivious to the fact that they come from different worlds and one of them will suffer. However, as readers, and like Linda, we know that this happiness will not last forever. The white sister will have a better fate than that of her slave sister because their skin-tone is different. The white child will be privileged and continue to experience the joys of her childhood; whereas the slave girl will be deprived of such happiness. As well as in adulthood, their fates are on opposite ends. Even though both girls are of kin and beautiful, their potential is pushed in two different directions because of slavery. And the fate of the slave girl is not full of sunshine and flowers. There is no sign of love. There is only “sin and shame, and misery.”

After reading that, how can we believe in happy endings? As a child, I’ve lived off of fairy-tales. I’ve been told stories of princesses, happy families, and adventures. My parents told me that the world was mine for the taking and with hard work and determination anything was possible. Even in my adulthood, I believe in all of that… just in different contexts. But those stories, the endless possibilities they hold, were what got me by. I saw love in my parents, loyalty in my friends, and empowerment in my education. For Linda it was the complete opposite. She saw the world differently because the convention of slavery taught her to see it that way. Growing up, my view on the world and how things work are definitely different. But to imagine myself stripped of possibilities, forced into labor, separated from family, abused, and reminded I am nothing but property every day of my life? I don’t know if I could ever live. And as Linda expressed, she didn’t want to either.

Every child should have the right to dream. They have a right to happiness. They have a right to exercise what it means to be free. However slavery deflates the air of that happy balloon and one just watches it spin-off to a far away place. Children should roam wild and free, and if they want to fly, then they should be told it’s possible. If they want to be happy, show them its real.